Sunday Surgical Scrub: 25 September 2016

sss-long-game

“I don’t think anyone is thinking long-term now.” -Thomas Mann

 

TASK AT HAND: This week I’m thinking about long-term plans. Strategy based on delayed gratification and personal investment. Plans that require patience, pragmatism, and perseverance. Playing the long game. Taking the long road.

We are endlessly inundated with short sells, quick fixes, and the lure of easy money. These are but myths, blasted on billboards, and endlessly running on our screens. Beware of those selling overnight success; sometimes they work, but most times they do not. Behind the overnight success, you can usually find years of work and dedication.

With everyone working the fast hustle, don’t be afraid to contradict and make long-term plans. Instead, hone strategy that takes time and consequence to develop. Having a long-term plan dramatically increases your chances of success solely because most are playing some version of the  fast hustle.

Obsession with overnight success. The want for short-term success is rooted in the desire to avoid pain. It is much easier to create a flash in the pan than stoke a fire. Inherent within us is a low baseline threshold for pain. This is a biological design so that we don’t get hurt. But don’t let this biology disrupt your ability to navigate complexities that require time.

We all know those who start out on a plan, only to abandon it as soon as they feel pain. Discomfort forces a switch to another project. I have found that one must train and accept that negative short-term pain is acceptable. It is merely a method to make us slow down and take notice. Then, upon realizing this, we can evaluate and look to overcome. It is a necessary (painful!) reminder of importance.

Planning for the long road. Personally, “we don’t mature momentarily, but over the long-term” (John C. Maxwell). Having long-term plans gives you significant advantages due to increased maturity and improved comprehension of the emotional intelligence inherent in relationships. In professional life, remember that “good decisions can have bad short-term outcomes but be great for the business long-term” (Gerry Schwartz). Excessive focus on short-term gains – and the inability to sustain short-term pain – can hinder your ability to prepare for long-term survival as business landscapes evolve.

How do you survive the long-term plan? Patience, perseverance, pragmatism. And when failure occurs, “keep your face always toward the sunshine – and shadows will fall behind you” (Walt Whitman). Night will come, and with it, darkness and doubt. Keep walking, and surely if you play the long game, you will see the sun come up again, and the shadows will once again fall behind you.

MEDICINE & MACULA: Check out our new publication in the September 2016 issue of the Canadian Journal of Ophthalmology entitled, Low power and type II errors in recent ophthalmology research (Zainab Khan MD, Jordan Milko MD, Munir Iqbal MD, Moness Masri MD & David RP Almeida MD MBA PhD).

cjo-power-study

We show that a large proportion of randomized clinic trials contain statistical errors. The results of the studies have dramatic effects on day-to-day clinical practice and need to be designed and evaluated carefully. Check out the publication here.

GRATIS: “I believe it’s less risky long-term to embrace change.” Charlie Ergen

My best to you,

David Almeida

david@davidalmeidamd.com

One Comment, RSS

  1. ana sanka September 25, 2016 @ 9:55 am

    Dear Dr. David

    It is so good to learn new things and you are a good teacher. Thanks for this fabulous article. I will follow your advice and wait for the new publication. Have yourself a wonderful week.

    Sincerely,
    Ana Sanka

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