Scars

“Nowadays I don’t want a perfect face and body – I want to wear the life I’ve lived.” Pat Benatar

 

TASK AT HAND: This week I’m thinking about scars. We normally think of scars as negative manifestations of past trauma. Sequels of serious harm. Instances where circumstances went beyond our ability to repair and restore our normal constitution. Whether they be physical, psychological or spiritual, scars are commonly unwanted tattoos of dramatic life events.

But this view is nearsighted.

As the insightful Pat Benatar quote echoes above – you, your body, your face and your smile – are reflections of the life you live. The scars you collect speak volumes of the miles you travel, the milestones you achieve, and the pain you reconcile. These are, whether negative or positive, the greatest hits of your life. The scars you collect are essential elements of your constitution; consequently, they should be celebrated for, so strong an effect they have, they change you forever.

“The scars you collect speak volumes of the miles you travel, the milestones you achieve, and the pain you reconcile.”

Don’t hide from your scars! There is no need for that “perfect face and body” Benatar alludes to above. Instead, embrace scars, imperfections, and stains. Actually, let me go one more: welcome the opportunity to develop new scars! Challenge your character and choices in ways that provide opportunities for personal growth and the ability to foster new relationships.

When life pushes you, push back.

When you are held down, the only next move is to get back up.

When you are questioned, answer in the affirmative. Answer without fear of scars.

 

MEDICINE & MACULA: Check out one of our recent publications, Dysfunctional Autonomic Regulation of the Choroid in Central Serous Chorioretinopathy by C Nathaniel Roybal, Elisabeth Sledz, Yasser Elshatory, Li Zhang, David RP Almeida, Eric K Chin, Brice Critser, Michael D Abramoff & Stephen R Russell.

It was published in the June 2017 issue of RETINA. You can find the study here.

We describe the effect of changing perfusion pressures on retinal and choroidal structure in central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC). In this study, we found that choroidal thickness increased in response to increased perfusion pressures in patients with CSC and not in normal controls. These findings likely represent an autonomic dysregulation of choroidal blood flow in patients with CSC.

 

GRATIS: Happy Father’s Day to the selfless individuals who, without fear, serve as mentors and role models!

 

My best to you,

David Almeida

david@davidalmeidamd.com

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